WYOMING - STATE OF WYOMING

WYOMING - STATE OF WYOMING
Cheyenne

Wyoming

Wyoming is a state in the Western United States. The western two thirds of the state is covered mostly with the mountain ranges and rangelands in the foothills of the Eastern Rocky Mountains, while the eastern third of the state is high elevation prairie known as the High Plains. Wyoming is the tenth largest U.S. state by area, and it is the least populous, with a U.S. Census population of 563,626 in 2010. This is a 14.1% increase since 2000. Cheyenne is the capital and the most populous city of Wyoming.

As specified in the designating legislation for the Territory of Wyoming, Wyoming's borders are lines of latitude, 41°N and 45°N, and longitude, 104°3'W and 111°3'W (27° W and 34° W of the Washington Meridian), making the shape of the state a latitude-longitude quadrangle. Wyoming is one of only three states (along with Colorado and Utah) to have borders along only straight latitudinal and longitudinal lines, rather than being defined by natural landmarks. Due to surveying inaccuracies during the 19th century, Wyoming's legal border deviates from the true latitude and longitude lines by up to half of a mile (.8 km) in some spots, especially in the mountainous region along the 45th parallel. Wyoming is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho. It is the tenth largest state in the United States in total area, containing 97,818 square miles (253,350 km2) and is made up of 23 counties. From the north border to the south border it is 276 miles (444 km); and from the east to the west border is 365 miles (587 km) at its south end and 342 miles (550 km) at the north end.

As specified in the designating legislation for the Territory of Wyoming, Wyoming's borders are lines of latitude, 41°N and 45°N, and longitude, 104°3'W and 111°3'W (27° W and 34° W of the Washington Meridian), making the shape of the state a latitude-longitude quadrangle. Wyoming is one of only three states (along with Colorado and Utah) to have borders along only straight latitudinal and longitudinal lines, rather than being defined by natural landmarks. Due to surveying inaccuracies during the 19th century, Wyoming's legal border deviates from the true latitude and longitude lines by up to half of a mile (0.8 km) in some spots, especially in the mountainous region along the 45th parallel. Wyoming is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho. It is the tenth largest state in the United States in total area, containing 97,814 square miles (253,340 km2) and is made up of 23 counties. From the north border to the south border it is 276 miles (444 km); and from the east to the west border is 365 miles (587 km) at its south end and 342 miles (550 km) at the north end.

The Great Plains meet the Rocky Mountains in Wyoming. The state is a great plateau broken by many mountain ranges. Surface elevations range from the summit of Gannett Peak in the Wind River Mountain Range, at 13,804 feet (4,207 m), to the Belle Fourche River valley in the state’s northeast corner, at 3,125 feet (952 m). In the northwest are the Absaroka, Owl Creek, Gros Ventre, Wind River and the Teton ranges. In the north central are the Big Horn Mountains; in the northeast, the Black Hills; and in the southern region the Laramie, Snowy and Sierra Madre ranges.

The Snowy Range in the south central part of the state is an extension of the Colorado Rockies in both geology and appearance. The Wind River Range in the west central part of the state is remote and includes more than 40 mountain peaks in excess of 13,000 ft (4,000 m) tall in addition to Gannett Peak, the highest peak in the state. The Big Horn Mountains in the north central portion are somewhat isolated from the bulk of the Rocky Mountains.
Wyoming terrain

The Teton Range in the northwest extends for 50 miles (80 km), part of which is included in Grand Teton National Park. The park includes the Grand Teton, the second highest peak in the state.

WYOMING MAP
The Continental Divide spans north-south across the central portion of the state. Rivers east of the divide drain into the Missouri River Basin and eventually the Gulf of Mexico. They are the North Platte, Wind, Big Horn and the Yellowstone rivers. The Snake River in northwest Wyoming eventually drains into the Columbia River and the Pacific Ocean, as does the Green River through the Colorado River Basin.

The Continental Divide forks in the south central part of the state in an area known as the Great Divide Basin where the waters that flow or precipitate into this area remain there and cannot flow to any ocean. Instead, because of the overall aridity of Wyoming, water in the Great Divide Basin simply sinks into the soil or evaporates.

Several rivers begin or flow through the state, including the Yellowstone River, Bighorn River, Green River, and the Snake River.

Wyoming's climate is generally semi-arid and continental (Köppen climate classification BSk), and is drier and windier in comparison to most of the United States with greater temperature extremes. Much of this is due to the topography of the state. Summers in Wyoming are warm with July high temperatures averaging between 85 and 95 °F (29 and 35 °C) in most of the state. With increasing elevation, however, this average drops rapidly with locations above 9,000 feet (2,700 m) averaging around 70 °F (21 °C). Summer nights throughout the state are characterized by a rapid cooldown with even the hottest locations averaging in the 50–60 °F (10–16 °C) range at night. In most of the state, most of the precipitation tends to fall in the late spring and early summer. Winters are cold, but are variable with periods of sometimes extreme cold interspersed between generally mild periods, with Chinook winds providing unusually warm temperatures in some locations. Wyoming is a dry state with much of the land receiving less than 10 inches (250 mm) of rainfall per year. Precipitation depends on elevation with lower areas in the Big Horn Basin averaging 5–8 inches (130–200 mm) (making the area nearly a true desert). The lower areas in the North and on the eastern plains typically average around 10–12 inches (250–300 mm), making the climate there semi-arid. Some mountain areas do receive a good amount of precipitation, 20 inches (510 mm) or more, much of it as snow, sometimes 200 inches (510 cm) or more annually. The state's highest recorded temperature is 114 °F (46 °C) at Basin on July 12, 1900 and the lowest recorded temperature is −66 °F (−54 °C) at Riverside on February 9, 1933.

The number of thunderstorm days vary across the state with the southeastern plains of the state having the most days of thunderstorm activity. Thunderstorm activity in the state is highest during the late spring and early summer. The southeastern corner of the state is the most vulnerable part of the state to tornado activity. Moving away from that point and westwards, the incidence of tornadoes drops dramatically with the west part of the state showing little vulnerability. Tornadoes, where they occur, tend to be small and brief, unlike some of those that occur a little further east.

Cheyenne Wyoming
Cheyenne Wyoming
Cheyenne Wyoming

 Cheyenne


Buford, The City of 1 Inhabitant

State: Wyoming
County: Albany
Founded: 1866
Area
• Total 0.02 sq mi (0.04 km2)
• Land 0.02 sq mi (0.04 km2)
• Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Population (2012)
• Total 1
• Density 65/sq mi (25/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
• Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP codes: 82052
Website: http://www.bufordtradingpost.com/

Buford is an unincorporated community in Albany County, Wyoming, United States. It is located between Laramie and Cheyenne on Interstate 80. Buford is at 8,000 feet (2,400 m) of elevation, making it the highest community on Interstate 80. The community is named Buford in honor of Major General John Buford.

History

Buford was founded in 1866, during the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad in Wyoming. At its peak, the town boasted a population of 2000. In 1880 a post office was built.

In 1992, the town was purchased by Don Sammons, who lived there with his son until his son moved away around 2007.

The town, consisting of a convenience store, gas station, and modular home on 4 hectares (9.9 acres) of land, was put up for sale after Sammons decided to move closer to his son. The town was purchased for $900,000 on April 5, 2012, by two unidentified Vietnamese men.

List of Cities in Wyoming


A
Afton, Aladdin, Albin, Alcova, Alpine, Alta, Alva, Arapahoe, Arminto, Arvada, Auburn

B
Baggs, Bairoil, Banner, Basin, Bedford, Beulah, Big Horn, Big Piney, Bill, Bondurant, Bosler, Boulder, Buffalo, Buford, Burlington, Burns, Byron

C
Carlile, Carpenter, Casper, Centennial, Cheyenne, Chugwater, Clearmont, Cody, Cokeville, Cora, Cowley, Crowheart

D
Daniel, Dayton, Deaver, Devils Tower, Diamondville, Dixon, Douglas, Dubois

E
Edgerton, Elk Mountain, Emblem, Encampment, Etna, Evanston, Evansville

F
Fairview, Farson, Fe Warren Afb, Fort Bridger, Fort Laramie, Fort Washakie, Four Corners, Frannie, Freedom, Frontier

G
Garrett, Gillette, Glendo, Glenrock, Grand Teton National Park, Granger, Granite Canon, Green River, Greybull, Grover, Guernsey

H
Hamilton Dome, Hanna, Hartville, Hawk Springs, Hiland, Hillsdale, Horse Creek, Hudson, Hulett, Huntley, Hyattville

J
Jackson, Jay Em, Jeffrey City, Jelm

K
Kaycee, Kelly, Kemmerer, Kinnear, Kirby

L
La Barge, Lagrange, Lance Creek, Lander, Laramie, Leiter, Linch, Lingle, Little America, Lonetree, Lost Springs, Lovell, Lusk, Lyman, Lysite

M
Manderson, Manville, Mc Kinnon, Medicine Bow, Meeteetse, Meriden, Midwest, Mills, Moorcroft, Moose, Moose Junction, Moran, Mountain View

N
Natrona, Newcastle

O
Opal, Osage, Otto

P
Parkman, Pavillion, Pine Bluffs, Pinedale, Point of Rocks, Powder River, Powell

R
Ralston, Ranchester, Rawlins, Recluse, Reliance, Riverton, Robertson, Rock River, Rock Springs, Rozet

S
Saddlestring, Saratoga, Savery, Shawnee, Shell, Sheridan, Shirley Basin, Shoshoni, Sinclair, Smoot, St Stephens, Story, Sundance, Superior

T
Ten Sleep, Teton Village, Thayne, Thermopolis, Tie Siding, Torrington

U
Upton

V
Van Tassell, Veteran

W
Walcott, Wamsutter, Wapiti, Weston, Wheatland, Wilson, Wolf, Worland, Wright, Wyarno

Y
Yellowstone National Park, Yoder

www.klimanaturali.org

Luciano Mende

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