ANGOON CITY (ALASKA) - GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY


Current Population: 585 (2012 DCED Certified Population)
Incorporation Type: 2nd Class City
Borough Located In: Unorganized
Taxes: Sales: 3%, Property: None, 3% Accommodations Tax

Angoon, Alaska Location and Climate
This Tlingit community is the only permanent settlement on Admiralty Island, located on the southwest coast at Kootznahoo Inlet. Angoon is 55 miles southwest of Juneau and 41 miles northeast of Sitka. It lies at approximately 57.50333° North Latitude and -134.58389° West Longitude. (Sec. 25, T050S, R067E, Copper River Meridian.) Angoon is located in the Juneau Recording District. The area encompasses 22.5 sq. miles of land and 16.1 sq. miles of water. Angoon's maritime climate is characterized by cool summers and mild winters. Summer temperatures range from 45 to 61; winter temperatures range from 25 to 39. Extremes in temperature have been recorded from -6 to 77. Angoon receives much less precipitation than is typical of Southeast Alaska. averaging 43 inches annually, including 63 inches of snowfall. Strong north winds during winter months cause rough seas, which may prevent aircraft landings.

Tlingit Natives inhabited AdmiraltyIsland for centuries, and today are the main residents in Angoon, a village of about 600 people on the western coast of the island. Located about 60 miles from Juneau, Angoon is the only permanent community on Admiralty Island. Alaska Native clans, such as the Dog Salmon and Bear, shape the art and family structures of the area. The Tlingit culture serves as the framework for ceremonies of birth, marriage and death.

Most residents lead a subsistence lifestyle with a strong respect for cultural traditions. The nearness of historic clan houses and modern buildings along Angoon streets are the obvious symbols of the forces of past and present at work in the village.

Community celebrations may include traditional potlatches or Christian church services. Subsistence resources such as salmon, deer, halibut, shellfish, kelp, berries and alder are gathered from nearby shorelines as they have been gathered for more than 1,000 years.

The community joined forces with environmental groups to promote monument and wilderness designation for Admiralty Island during the 1970s.
In accordance with the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980, the village corporation (Kootznoowoo, Inc.) selected lands on Prince of Wales Island in deference for culturally important lands on Admiralty Island.

The city, tribal government, village corporation and Forest Service are actively working together to provide essential services within the community and to enhance and diversify Angoon’s economy in a manner which will be compatible with its culture.

Luciano Mende

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